Add PowerShell-7 preview to Windows Terminal in 30 seconds

Fun times in Windows land over the last few days with the release of new previews of Windows Terminal (v0.4) and PowerShell 7 (Preview 3).

To celebrate, here’s a simple script that you can copy-and-paste into a PowerShell window to add PowerShell 7 to Windows Terminal. (You can even use the Windows Terminal PowerShell terminal. Wow!)

The whole thing might take 30 seconds, which is a significant improvement on my last effort of 2 minutes. Why not take 1 minutes 30 seconds to make yourself a drink?

Pre-requisites:

  • PowerShell 7-preview x64 is installed
  • Windows Terminal v0.4 is installed and has been run

Here’s what it looks like:

Here’s the code:

$terminalFolderPath = "$env:LOCALAPPDATA\Packages\Microsoft.WindowsTerminal_8wekyb3d8bbwe\LocalState"
# Get Windows Terminal settings file
$settingsFilePath = Join-Path $terminalFolderPath 'profiles.json'
$json = Get-Content $settingsFilePath | ConvertFrom-Json
# Get profiles
$profiles = $json.profiles
# Make a copy of first profile and configure for PS7 x64
$ps7 = $profiles[0].psobject.Copy()
$ps7.name = 'PowerShell 7-preview (x64)'
$ps7.commandline = 'C:\Program Files\PowerShell\7-preview\pwsh.exe'
$ps7.guid = '{' + (New-Guid).ToString() + '}'
# Download and set icon
$pwsh7IconPath = Join-Path $terminalFolderPath 'pwsh7.ico'
Invoke-WebRequest -Uri 'https://raw.githubusercontent.com/weebsnore/Add-PS7ToWindowsTerminal/master/pwsh7.ico' -OutFile $pwsh7IconPath
$ps7.icon = $pwsh7IconPath
# Write updated settings file to disk
$json.profiles = $profiles + $ps7
$json | ConvertTo-Json | Out-File $settingsFilePath

And here it is on GitHub.

Tip: avoid Wait-Debugger gotcha on Azure Functions

My biggest gotcha with Azure Functions is that you need to put Wait-Debugger in your script for local debugging, and it’s easy to forget to remove it when you deploy to Azure.

My last post talked about exploring Azure Functions’ environment, and I mentioned that you could compare the cloud version with its locally-run approximation.

Well, when you’re running your function locally, the variable $env:AZURE_FUNCTIONS_ENVIRONMENT is set to Development.

This means you can ensure that you never leave a function hanging at Wait-Debugger in the cloud by wrapping it like this:

if ($env:AZURE_FUNCTIONS_ENVIRONMENT -eq 'Development') {
    Wait-Debugger
}

Another solution is to wrap your debug command like this:

if ($Request.Query.Debug -eq 'True') {
    Wait-Debugger
}

And then invoke your function with &Debug=True when you want to debug it.

How do you handle this problem?

Resize browser window with PowerShell

I like to make little videos to go with my blog posts, and today I’ve been looking for a way to resize my browser window to a consistent size for recording.

Google immediately turned up this little beauty in the TechNet Script Center:

But when I tried it out:

Set-Window -ProcessName msedge -Width 1024 -Height 768

…I got a scary error:

Cannot convert argument "hWnd", with value: "System.Object[]", for "GetWindowRect" to type "System.IntPtr": "Cannot convert the "System.Object[]" value of type "System.Object[]" to type "System.IntPtr"."
At C:\Git\PowerShell\Set-Window.ps1:91 char:9
+         $Return = [Window]::GetWindowRect($Handle,[ref]$Rectangle)
+         ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
+ CategoryInfo          : NotSpecified: (:) [], MethodException
+ FullyQualifiedErrorId : MethodArgumentConversionInvalidCastArgument

Here are the relevant lines from the function:

$Handle = (Get-Process -Name $ProcessName).MainWindowHandle
$Return = [Window]::GetWindowRect($Handle,[ref]$Rectangle)

A bit of exploring shows that one of the msedge processes is very different from the others:

$msedge = Get-Process msedge

$msedge

 NPM(K)    PM(M)      WS(M)     CPU(s)      Id  SI ProcessName
 ------    -----      -----     ------      --  -- -----------
     10     1.77       2.64       0.03     904   1 msedge
     19    17.69      30.85       0.34    4044   1 msedge
     57   128.71     150.07      57.81    5000   1 msedge
     83   185.82     182.69      38.77    8840   1 msedge
     29    47.08      75.16       9.78    9548   1 msedge
     83    82.12     128.55     171.92   11304   1 msedge
     22    27.96      41.45       0.41   11596   1 msedge
     20    21.31      38.14       2.47   12664   1 msedge
     49   303.89     156.82     116.14   12828   1 msedge
     24    29.71      48.62       1.52   14788   1 msedge
     26    21.57      31.14      25.20   15904   1 msedge
     56   132.80     157.91      76.39   15976   1 msedge
     20    19.50      33.82       0.27   16360   1 msedge
     16    11.88      19.46       0.05   16416   1 msedge
     34    59.82      89.91       3.55   17300   1 msedge
     29    48.37      76.49       3.34   17884   1 msedge
     22    25.07      42.07       0.41   18408   1 msedge
     27    51.70      78.73       5.69   18492   1 msedge
     26    39.59      60.88       0.81   18520   1 msedge
     28    54.87      73.89      18.56   19080   1 msedge
     47   108.27     135.33      26.95   19888   1 msedge

$msedge.MainWindowHandle

0
0
0
0
0
4326398
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0
0

This was my first solution, which works fine:

# Only get non-zero handles
$Handle = (Get-Process -Name $ProcessName).MainWindowHandle | Where-Object {$_.ToInt32() -gt 0}
# The Handles have type IntPtr. Without .ToInt32() you get this error:
# Cannot compare "0" because it is not IComparable

But after a bit of poking around, I think this is a little better:

# Only get process whose parent is explorer
$Handle = (Get-Process -Name $ProcessName | Where-Object {$_.Parent.ProcessName -eq 'explorer'}).MainWindowHandle